‘I was not sure I wanted to leave’: Former Irish Times reporter says she left the publication for the ‘wrong reasons’

A former journalist has said she was “stunned” to leave the Irish Times after she was told by the publication’s managing editor that she would not be paid and that she was being “unfairly targeted”.

Marie Byrne was paid €2,500 (£2,300) to leave for the Irish Independent in 2015, after she wrote a scathing column accusing the paper of not doing enough to expose the corruption of the political class.

In the column, she described the editorial board as “the most corrupt and incompetent bunch of people I have ever encountered”.

She left the paper in December after three months and said that she has not spoken to the managing editor since.

“It is not a company that is run by journalists. “

“If you ask people who have worked there, they will tell you that it is a very good organisation, but it is run with an agenda that is designed to benefit the company’s owners.” “

The Irish Independent’s managing director, Stephen McGuinness, said in a statement that Ms Byrne “has made it clear she does not want to work for this company” and that the decision to leave was not the result of her criticisms of the paper’s coverage. “

If you ask people who have worked there, they will tell you that it is a very good organisation, but it is run with an agenda that is designed to benefit the company’s owners.”

The Irish Independent’s managing director, Stephen McGuinness, said in a statement that Ms Byrne “has made it clear she does not want to work for this company” and that the decision to leave was not the result of her criticisms of the paper’s coverage.

“Her reasons for leaving the Irish Express were not just personal, but also related to her belief that this was not a good place to work,” Mr McGuinness said.

“This was not an issue that was resolved in a way that was fair to her.”

Ms Byrne’s reasons for quitting were not resolved in an unfair way: the Irish Observer.

The Irish Observer’s editor, Mark Doyle, said he and other senior editors were “shocked and dismayned” by Ms Byrne leaving the paper, which was run by Mr McGuissys family.

“We are disappointed that Marie had not been given a fair hearing at the hearing.

“In a business that is so competitive and competitive in the market place, we feel very strongly that we have to treat every employee with respect. “

“She felt that we had a duty to her, to her family, to do that. “

“So it’s not a surprise that she made the decision that she did and that it was not fair to us.” “

In the interview, Ms Byrne also spoke about how she felt after her resignation, saying that she had been subjected to a “coup d’etat”. “

So it’s not a surprise that she made the decision that she did and that it was not fair to us.”

In the interview, Ms Byrne also spoke about how she felt after her resignation, saying that she had been subjected to a “coup d’etat”.

“The day I resigned, I was a little shocked, but then I saw what had happened,” she said.

“They have to work out what the market is, what people want to hear and then make the best of it.””

I was being unfairly targeted, and the papers don’t like that.” “

They have to work out what the market is, what people want to hear and then make the best of it.”

I was being unfairly targeted, and the papers don’t like that.

I thought she was doing a very well job, but she wasn’t doing a good job,” Mr Gorman said.